You’ve heard of Stonehenge, but have you heard of Manhattanhenge?

Perhaps Carhenge would be more your style.

Either way, all these henges give us a look at how words get created. How many words get made this way? More than you’d think.

Linguist Daniel Midgley is back for this episode of Talk the Talk.


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Show notes

Manhattanhenge
http://cosmiclog.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2012/05/30/11939663-new-yorkers-get-second-chance-to-see-monumental-manhattanhenge?lite
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/05/31/manhattanhenge-2012-a-full-sun-aligns-with-nyc-grid_n_1558857.html#s=1039850

Carhenge
http://www.carhenge.com/

Lots of henges!
http://www.ancient-wisdom.co.uk/henges.htm
(Credibility warning: New age)

Stonehenge etymology
http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=Stonehenge&allowed_in_frame=0

‘-core’ etymology
http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?allowed_in_frame=0&search=core&searchmode=none

‘alcohol’ etymology
http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=alcohol

Let’s finish it off with the Helicat.
http://www.popsci.com.au/technology/it-s-a-bird-it-s-a-plane-it-s-helicat