Do you like long discussions or heavy conversations?

If you understood that, you’re good at metaphors. They help us express ourselves, and even understand things. But what’s happening in our brains when we hear them? And can metaphors change our perception of the world?

Social neuroscientist Thalia Wheatley discusses deep thoughts with linguist Daniel Midgley on this episode of Talk the Talk.


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Promo with Jane Hebiton


Show notes

Revolting Rhymes pulled from shelves at Aldi.
http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/aug/28/aldi-takes-roald-dahls-revolting-rhymes-off-shelves-over-the-word-slut

Thalia Wheatley’s work in metaphor
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2014-02/dc-dsp_1020414.php

Follow her @ThaliaWheatley
https://twitter.com/ThaliaWheatley

Metaphors actually trigger the sensory parts of our brains
http://io9.com/5883554/metaphors-actually-trigger-the-sensory-parts-of-our-brains

Rogeting
http://www.theguardian.com/education/shortcuts/2014/aug/08/rogeting-sinister-buttocks-students-essays-plagiarising-thesaurus

Such buttocks. Much sinister. Wow.
http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/news/sinister-buttocks-roget-would-blush-at-the-crafty-cheek/2015027.article

Please stop.
http://www.slate.com/articles/life/education/2014/08/writing_clearly_in_student_papers_the_right_click_thesaurus_and_rogeting.html


Show tunes

‘Heart Is a Drum’ by Beck
from the album Morning Phase

‘Everything You Do Is a Balloon’ by Boards of Canada
from the album Boc Maxima