Category: Old English

Episode 265: Universal Grammar 2 (featuring Dan Everett and Lynne Murphy)

The biggest idea in linguistics is back on the table.

Is there such a thing as the Universal Grammar? Do you have to have a human brain to learn language, or is learning a language just like learning anything else? And are one man’s insights into Amazonian languages sufficient to demolish this theoretical edifice?

Linguists Dan Everett and Lynne Murphy talk to Daniel, Ben, and Kylie on this episode of Talk the Talk.


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Promo with Dylan Websdane


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Patreon extras for this episode

Interview with Dan Everett 2016-10-07 (complete)

Cutting Room Floor 265: Universal Grammar 2

265: Universal Grammar 2 (featuring Dan Everett and Lynne Murphy) [128kbps] (for everyone)


Show notes

Warning: Bad linguistics alert

‘Th’ sound to vanish from English language by 2066 because of multiculturalism, say linguists
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2016/09/28/th-sound-to-vanish-from-english-language-by-2066-because-of-mult/

Here’s how the English language could sound incredibly different in 50 years
http://www.sciencealert.com/the-english-language-could-sound-incredibly-different-in-50-years-study-finds

Our accents are under threat: dialects may die as computers strip the beauty from language
http://www.wired.co.uk/article/dialect-english-regional-accents

It’s the end of the frog and toad for regional slang, says report
https://www.theguardian.com/education/2016/sep/29/its-the-end-of-the-frog-and-toad-for-regional-slang-says-report

XKCD:

Better linguistics alert

Researchers are using an app to crowdsource how the English language has changed
http://qz.com/694906/researchers-are-using-an-app-to-crowdsource-how-the-english-language-has-changed/

How do you say ‘scone’? English regional accents decline as ‘southern’ accent becomes widespread
http://home.bt.com/news/uk-news/how-do-you-say-scone-english-regional-accents-decline-as-southern-accent-becomes-widespread-11364064620130

How London has killed off elements of local dialects across England – in seven maps
https://www.indy100.com/article/how-london-has-killed-off-elements-of-local-dialects-across-englandin-seven-maps–ZJxofkDwH7Z

New Scientist: The Electric Kool-Aid language test
https://www.newscientist.com/article/2108618-the-electric-kool-aid-language-test/

Dan Everett: Who’s afraid of the big bad Wolfe? Apparently everyone.
https://daneverettbooks.com/whos-afraid-of-the-big-bad-wolfe-apparently-everyone/

Trump recorded having extremely lewd conversation about women in 2005
https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/trump-recorded-having-extremely-lewd-conversation-about-women-in-2005/2016/10/07/3b9ce776-8cb4-11e6-bf8a-3d26847eeed4_story.html

A banner day for profanity
https://stronglang.wordpress.com/2016/10/08/a-banner-day-for-profanity/

An Oxford linguist on the dangers of dismissing comments about sexual assault as “locker-room talk”
http://qz.com/807395/donald-trump-oxford-linguist-deborah-cameron-explains-the-dangers-of-dismissing-comments-about-sexual-assault-as-locker-room-talk/

“Locker room” language encourages rape culture, even if it stays private
http://qz.com/806386/donald-trumps-lewd-access-hollywood-video-locker-room-language-encourages-rape-culture/

Lynne Murphy on Twitter: @lynneguist
https://twitter.com/lynneguist

Lynne’s blog: Separated by a Common Language
https://separatedbyacommonlanguage.blogspot.com.au

Linguistics explains why Trump sounds racist when he says “the” African Americans
http://qz.com/806174/second-presidential-debate-linguistics-explains-why-donald-trump-sounds-racist-when-he-says-the-african-americans/

Everything that was said at the second Donald Trump vs. Hillary Clinton debate, highlighted
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2016/10/09/everything-that-was-said-at-the-second-donald-trump-vs-hillary-clinton-debate-highlighted/

“open mic” and “on the mic”


Show tunes

Find the tracks we play on the RTRFM webpage for this episode.

Image credit: http://www.chronicle.com/img/photos/biz/photo_19711_portrait_wide.jpg

Episode 252: The Tower of Babel

Is there anything to the story of the Tower of Babel?

It’s a legend about why human languages are so different. So was there really only one human language a long time ago? Maybe — but how does this match up with the biblical account of the confounding of tongues?

Linguist Daniel Midgley puts an end to the confusion on this episode of Talk the Talk.


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Promo with Kylie Sturgess


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As always, Whitney Fielding and Matt are keeping Talk the Talk afloat with their support. Thanks, you guys!

Become a Patreon supporter yourself and get access to bonus audio, extra blog posts, Talk the Talk merch, and more!


Show notes

All 72 New Unicode 9 Emoji, Definitively Ranked From Most Exciting To Most Meh
http://www.bustle.com/articles/168770-all-72-new-unicode-9-emoji-definitively-ranked-from-most-exciting-to-most-meh

Apple releases animated emoji sticker packs for iOS 10 Messages
http://appleinsider.com/articles/16/07/02/apple-releases-animated-emoji-sticker-packs-for-ios-10-messages

Apple, Facebook and Google ban rifle emoji from Olympics update
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/2016/06/20/apple-facebook-and-google-ban-rifle-emoji-from-olympics-update/

Rifle emoji blocked from phones ‘after pressure from Apple’
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/jun/20/apple-rifle-emoji-phones-unicode

Here’s The Reason Why There Will Be No Rifle Emoji
http://www.techtimes.com/articles/165709/20160618/here-s-reason-why-will-rifle-emoji.htm

What happened to the rifle emoji?
http://www.newstatesman.com/science-tech/social-media/2016/06/what-happened-rifle-emoji

Could an emoji death threat land you in jail?
http://www.cbc.ca/newsblogs/yourcommunity/2014/01/could-an-emoji-death-threat-land-you-in-jail.html

RationalWiki: Tower of Babel
http://rationalwiki.org/wiki/Tower_of_Babel

Skeptics Annotated Bible: Genesis 11
http://skepticsannotatedbible.com/gen/11.html

Focus On Tower of Babel
https://global.oup.com/obso/focus/focus_on_towerbabel/

The Wrathful Dispersion Controversy: A Canadian Perspective
http://specgram.com/CLI.1/06.pheevr.dispersion.html

Yes, people do believe this.
Gallup: “Twenty-eight percent of Americans believe the Bible is the actual word of God and that it should be taken literally.”
http://www.gallup.com/poll/170834/three-four-bible-word-god.aspx

Grain of salt alert for the next two articles!

The Tower of Babel Account: A Linguistic Consideration
http://smithandfranklin.com/current-issues/The-Tower-of-Babel-Account-A-Linguistic-Consideration/9/5/98/html

Answers in Genesis: Was the Dispersion at Babel a Real Event?
https://answersingenesis.org/tower-of-babel/was-the-dispersion-at-babel-a-real-event/

The Canterbury Tales (in Middle English)
http://www.librarius.com/cantales.htm

There are more things in prehistory than are dreamt of in our urheimat
http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/gnxp/2012/08/there-are-more-things-in-prehistory-than-are-dreamt-of-in-our-urheimat/

Ussher Chronology
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ussher_chronology

Can the Ussher Chronology Be Trusted?
http://www.icr.org/article/can-ussher-chronology-be-trusted/

Cuneiform
http://www.ancient.eu/cuneiform/

Makapansgat pebble
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Makapansgat_pebble

paleo_pebble-1-400x500

I’m all ears: fossils reveal human ancestors’ hearing abilities
http://www.reuters.com/article/science-hearing-idUSL1N11U03020150925

2-million-year-old fossils reveal hearing abilities of early humans
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2015-09/bu-2fr092415.php

babel moon landings

Recovery Connection: Drunkorexia
https://www.recoveryconnection.com/addiction-resources/common-eating-disorders/drunkorexia/

‘Drunkorexia’ phenomena prominent in young Australian women, research finds
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-06-30/drunkorexia-phenomena-prominent-in-young-australian-women/7556476

The scary trend sweeping across Australian universities
http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/health/health-problems/the-scary-trend-sweeping-across-australian-universities/news-story/7b8959b65655d798253c161ae66e2816

The Butterfly Foundation — Support for Australians experiencing eating disorders
http://thebutterflyfoundation.org.au

Government of Western Australia — Drug and Alcohol Office
http://www.dao.health.wa.gov.au/Home.aspx

Bill Nye visited a Noah’s Ark he doesn’t believe should exist
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/arts-and-entertainment/wp/2016/07/10/bill-nye-visited-a-noahs-ark-he-doesnt-believe-should-exist/

Kan Ham’s Blog: Bill Nye Visits the Ark Encounter
https://answersingenesis.org/blogs/ken-ham/2016/07/08/bill-nye-visits-ark-encounter/


Show tunes

Find the tracks we play on the RTRFM webpage for this episode.

Image credit: https://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/d/dore/gustave/bible/plates/006.jpg

Episode 238: Questions, Questions

Our listeners have questions, and we have answers.

Why do we say boo? or a whole ‘nother? And our Latin-minded friends have a few questions, as well.

Linguist Daniel Midgley answers them all on this episode of Talk the Talk.


Listen to this episode

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Promo with Scott Quigg


Show notes

Boaty McBoatface: Man behind the name apologises to company for social media ‘storm’
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-03-22/boaty-mcboatface-inventor-apologises-to-nerc-for-storm/7265842

The linguistics of signifying time: The human gesture as clock
http://www.mpi.nl/the-linguistics-of-signifying-time-the-human-gesture-as-clock

Study Uncovers Unusual Method of Communicating Human Concept of Time
http://www.sci-news.com/othersciences/linguistics/nheengatu-language-method-concept-time-03711.html

Early draft of Dr Floyd’s paper (PDF)
http://www.linguisticsociety.org/sites/default/files/archived-documents/Lg_92.1_Floyd.pdf

Global scare tactics: how to say “boo”
https://www.languagetrainers.com/blog/2011/01/07/global-scare-tactics-how-to-say-boo/

A Biography Of ‘Boo’ Across The World
http://www.npr.org/2014/10/31/360461195/a-biography-of-boo-across-the-world

When Did Ghosts Start Saying “Boo”?
http://www.slate.com/articles/life/explainer/2011/10/why_do_ghosts_say_boo_.html

An Etymological Dictionary of the Scottish Language:
Google Books link

TravelTexas missed a big opportunity.
https://www.traveltexas.com/#/

Linguists discuss a whole ‘nother
https://linguistlist.org/issues/14/14-2909.html

Tmesis: A Whole Nother Word to Use!
https://speechdudes.wordpress.com/2013/10/03/tmesis-a-whole-nother-word-to-use/

What’s a “Napron”?
http://maevemaddox.com/books/bibliography/whats-a-napron

Examples of a whole ‘nother from the Cambridge History of the English Language
Google Books link

Is Irregardless a Word?
http://blog.dictionary.com/is-irregardless-a-word/

Etymonline: bacteria
http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=bacteria

Phubbing: An invented word that might be too useful to ignore
http://www.merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/phubbing-words-we%27re-watching

Etymonline: snub
http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=snub&allowed_in_frame=0


Show tunes

Find the tracks we play on the RTRFM webpage for this episode.

Image credit: http://hdimagesnew.com/question-mark-hd-wallpaper/

Episode 210: Listener Feedback

We get a lot of feedback from listeners.

So for this episode, we decided to answer questions, and settle some scores. We even ask the musical question: “How do you alphabetise your music collection?”

All on this episode of Talk the Talk.


Listen to this episode

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Promo with Em Burrows


Show notes

The Ladyslipper — a long-running catalogue for music by and for women (and everybody else).
https://www.ladyslipper.org

Feast Your Eyes on This Beautiful Linguistic Family Tree
http://mentalfloss.com/article/59665/feast-your-eyes-beautiful-linguistic-family-tree

The Wave Model of language change
https://prezi.com/_uvdnnm68kkl/wave-model-for-language-change/

What can you do with Linguistics?

Why are some words not allowed in Scrabble
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=125676618

Offensive words omitted from the OSPD3
http://home.teleport.com/%7Estevena/scrabble/expurg.html


Show tunes

Find the tracks we play on the RTRFM webpage for this episode.

Image credit: http://www.parachutedigitalmarketing.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/Digital-Questions-to-Ask.jpg

Episode 158: English Plurals

Is it octopuses or octopi? What about mongooses? Are they mongeese?

Sure, you can use plural –s, but do you know your way around the unusual plurals of English?

Have no fear — linguist Daniel Midgley takes you through the ins and outs on this episode of Talk the Talk.


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Promo with James Hall


Show notes

Cambridge is leaving apostrophes out of new street names
http://www.ndtv.com/article/offbeat/apostrophes-now-britain-at-war-over-missing-punctuation-499805

Grammar pedants are pissed
http://metro.co.uk/2014/02/02/cambridge-irresponsible-for-dropping-apostrophes-from-new-road-signs-4287467/

Sometimes the apostrophe can convey information about history, as in “Queens’ College”
http://www.cambridge-news.co.uk/News/Apostrophe-catastrophe-as-Cambridge-City-Council-bans-punctuation-from-new-street-names-20140117060000.htm

Plural -s comes from Old English
http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=-s&allowed_in_frame=0

More about Old English nouns
https://www.wmich.edu/medieval/resources/IOE/inflnoun.html

But -n forms were popular too, and some have persisted.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_plurals#Plurals_in_-.28e.29n

The plural for ‘man’ underwent i-mutation.
http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=man

What’s i-mutation?
http://www.etymonline.com/imutate.php

And how about those -us forms?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plural_form_of_words_ending_in_-us

Not everything that ends in -us pluralises as -i.
http://alt-usage-english.org/excerpts/fxplural.html

There are second declension masculine nouns that end in -us
http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Appendix:Latin_second_declension#Masculine

but there are also third declension neuter nouns, also ending in -us.
http://latin-dictionary.net/grammar/nouns/declensions/third-declension

Cactus is cacti though.
http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=cactus

Octopus isn’t Latin really.
http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=octopus

Octopuses is the most popular.

Toyota wants the plural of Prius to be Prii. They had a vote.
http://www.engadget.com/2011/02/21/toyota-decrees-the-plural-of-prius-is-prii-your-latin-teach/

Here’s a big ol’ list of plural forms
http://www.writers.com/tips_spelling.html

Here’s another.
http://www.prdaily.com/Main/Articles/39_plural_forms_that_might_confuse_writers_10648.aspx#

‘Selfie’ is semantically mutating
http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/art/features/selfies-there-are-groupies-ussies-shelfies-and-even-sealfies–but-selfobsessed-portraiture-isnt-just-a-modern-phenomenon-9234004.html


Show tunes

‘Stars Are Stars’ by Echo and the Bunnymen
from the album Seven Seas / Life at Brian’s (EP)

‘Outlines and Colours’ by Runner
from the album RTRfm In the Pines 20th Anniversary

Episode 142: Yeah No

Yes and no.

You use these words all the time, but how often do you think about them? They’re not nouns, they’re not verbs, so what are they? Why do we nod our heads yes and shake our heads no? And what’s the deal with yeah no?

Linguist Daniel Midgley explains it all on this episode of Talk the Talk.


Listen to this episode

Or subscribe via iTunes
Click here for more options: How to listen to Talk the Talk


Ben wondered whether we could do a whole based on two words, but we did it. It was easy, since it’s two of the richest and most interesting words in English: yes and no. And I liked getting to the bottom of the quasi-Australian expression yeah no.

The sad news is that Marcia Wallace (Miss Krabappel of the Simpsons) has passed on. I try to work the word cromulent into conversations whenever I can, so this was a sad one for me.

Also, as a kid, I was a huge game show fan, so I remember her from Password Plus, where she appeared frequently. In fact, I just caught this clip from those days. The answer was Harry and she elicited hairy from her team-mate, which then caused the judges to say they got the answer wrong because they’re pronounced differently.

I actually can’t watch this; it’s too painful! Yes, Harry and hairy are pronounced differently in some varieties of English, but not in all. In fact, my variety — Pacific Northwest English — has the Mary/marry/merry merger, so we say them all the same. And yet here’s the host Tom Kennedy, trying to explain phonology terribly, appealing to authority all the while. Aaargh! Time to invent that time machine.


Show notes

The school that banned texting during breaks
http://au.news.yahoo.com/thewest/a/-/wa/19570730/school-bans-phones-at-breaks/

More thoughts from my blog
http://goodreasonblog.blogspot.com.au/2013/11/school-bans-texting-at-breaks.html

Origin of yes
http://etymonline.com/index.php?term=yes&allowed_in_frame=0

Origin of no
http://etymonline.com/index.php?term=no&allowed_in_frame=0

English used to have a four-part system with yes, yea, no, and nay.
http://english.stackexchange.com/questions/28581/did-english-ever-have-a-word-for-yes-for-negative-questions

And what’s the deal with aye?
http://etymonline.com/?term=aye

What part of speech is yes and no?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yes_and_no

Why do we nod ‘yes’ and shake ‘no’?
http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/619/why-do-we-nod-our-heads-for-yes-and-shake-them-for-no

Darwin thought it was innate. Search on this page for ‘Signs of affirmation or approval, and of negation or disapproval: nodding and shaking the head.
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/1227/1227-h/1227-h.htm

For Bulgarians, it’s the opposite.
http://goeasteurope.about.com/od/bulgariaandthebalkans/qt/yesandno.htm

Burridge and Florey’s treatment of yeah-no: “Yeah-no, he’s a good kid.” (Paywall.)
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/0726860022000013166?journalCode=cajl20#preview

It’s kind of Australian,
http://www.languagehat.com/archives/001395.php

kind of not.
http://itre.cis.upenn.edu/~myl/languagelog/archives/005523.html

Ben Yagoda’s take
http://chronicle.com/blogs/linguafranca/2012/06/14/yeah-no/

Embiggen and cromulent appeared in this episode of the Simpsons.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lisa_the_Iconoclast

Here’s the clip:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BqW5XTuRp_8


Show tunes

‘Say Yes’ by Elliott Smith
from the album Either/Or

‘There’s No Other Way’ by Blur
from the album Leisure

Episode 121: GIF

You see an animated picture on the web. Is it a GIF or a JIF?

For decades, this simple question has ignited controversy and set up warring factions. How are you supposed to say it? And why is this even a question? What’s the deal with the letter G?

Linguist Daniel Midgley has answers — but you’re not going to like them — on this episode of Talk the Talk.


Listen to this episode

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Click here for more options: How to listen to Talk the Talk


I’ve always called it a GIF (like ‘gift’ but with no ‘t’). That’s the only way I’ve ever heard it — on two continents, no less. But I’m aware that some people call it a ‘jif’. I guess I don’t move in those circles. But I can accept that both are okay because, hey, I can accept the validity of things I don’t actually do. What a concept!

Seriously, isn’t it weird that intelligent people can accept other people’s right to do things they don’t do themselves — eat meat, have threesomes, wear plaid — but when it comes to language, they’re like “ERADICATE THE DEVIATORS!”

Anyway, this show’s about GIF, and it’s a fun one. We even strap into the time machine and find out about the letter G.

And if that’s not enough, there’s even a blooper from today’s show.


Show notes

I’m a fan of reverse GIFs. Perhaps FIGs?
http://now.msn.com/reverse-gifs-cool-and-funny-animations

Yep, eating cotton candy / fairy floss in reverse:
http://weknowmemes.com/2013/05/eating-cotton-candy-in-reverse/

Here’s a pro-JIF site.
http://www.olsenhome.com/gif/

The inventor of the GIF format, Steve Wilhite, was honoured with a Webby award last week. He always insisted that it was ‘jif’.
http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/05/21/an-honor-for-the-creator-of-the-gif/?smid=tw-nytimes

And he took the opportunity to make that point in lieu of an acceptance speech.
http://www.theverge.com/2013/5/22/4354782/steve-wilhite-gif-creator-webby-award

But who cares?
http://thehairpin.com/2013/05/please-continue-pronouncing-gif-any-way-you-please

“GIF inventor proves there are no limits on acting like a chode”
http://www.ign.com/boards/threads/gif-inventor-proves-there-are-no-limits-on-acting-like-a-chode.453044499/

The controversy rages unabated.
http://www.cbc.ca/news/yourcommunity/2013/05/gif-inventor-tries-fails-to-settle-pronuncation-question.html

The US President has plumped for ‘gif’
http://whitehouse.tumblr.com/post/48938628507/the-white-house-tumbling-things

But I’m more inclined to listen to William Labov.
http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2011/02/tech-etymology-animated-gif/70504/

howjsay.com refuses to take a stand.
http://www.howjsay.com/index.php?word=gif&submit=Submit

Really, both are correct.
http://urbantimes.co/2013/05/the-gif-pronunciation-debate-and-the-english-language/

This is a really terrible compromise.
http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2012/08/finally-a-way-out-of-the-gif-pronunciation-quagmire/260670/

Hey, look, it’s a Jif GIF.
http://imgur.com/r/funny/eVTFBcn

1.21 gigawatts of power?!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mjCRUvX2D0E

Nephew
http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=nephew&allowed_in_frame=0

Breaking: White House Tumblr says it’s GIF, with a ‘hard G’
https://www.cnet.com/news/breaking-white-house-tumblr-says-its-gif-with-a-hard-g/

The letter G used to be a C.
http://hotword.dictionary.com/gandc/

And it’s had a lot of pronunciations.
http://mentalfloss.com/article/50733/why-are-there-two-pronunciations-g

More from Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hard_and_soft_G


Show tunes

‘Gigantic’ by the Pixies
from the album Surfer Rosa

‘Gila’ by Beach House
from the album Devotion

Episode 108: Language in Utero

Children learn language pretty fast.

But a new study shows that babies who are even a few hours old can tell the difference between their mother tongue and other languages. How do they do it?

Linguist Daniel Midgley gets in touch with his inner child on this episode of Talk the Talk.


Listen to this episode

Or subscribe via iTunes
Click here for more options: How to listen to Talk the Talk


I wasn’t planning to talk about Old English in this podcast. It’s meant to be about babies and how they can hear vowels in the womb. But Ben liked the idea of having a ‘dual pronoun’ — wit was the word for ‘the two of us’ — so he’s bringing it back. I’ll help him. It might not catch on, but wit shall do wit’s best.

There’s also stuff about counting. Can’t get enough about words for numbers.


Show notes

We know babies prefer the language spoken by their mother
http://books.google.com.au

and now it seems that they can hear vowel sounds in utero.
http://www.sciencenews.org/view/generic/id/347400/description/Language_learning_may_begin_before_birth
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-womb-babies-language-mothers.html

In other news, slightly older children can distinguish numbers up to four
http://theamericanscholar.org/babies-bamboozled-by-numbers/#.USbEclq61Jk

but small differences between large numbers sometimes evades them.
http://babylab.berkeley.edu/XuArriaga.pdf

Languages handle numbers differently. There are ‘one, two, many’ languages, and even ‘one, two, three, many’ languages, but there aren’t any ‘one, two, three, four, many’ languages.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grammatical_number

English used to have dual pronouns.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_English_grammar#Pronouns


Show tunes

No, we didn’t play anything from Nirvana’s ‘In Utero’.

‘Salt Water Sound’ by Zero 7
from the album Simple Things

‘Baby Blue’ by Martina Topley-Bird
from the album Some Place Simple

Episode 102: Non-English Wikipedias

Many of us turn to Wikipedia when learning about something new.

And most major languages have their own Wikipedia. But wikis also come in a few unexpected flavours, including Latin, Old English, and even a few constructed languages.

Linguist Daniel Midgley volunteers the information on this episode of Talk the Talk.


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It all started when my friend Ash showed me the Anglish Moot, which is the Wiki for the constructed language Anglish. I thought it was fascinating. I’ve sometimes wondered what English would be like if we only had Germanic words, and here someone’s gone and answered our question. How about that.

From there, I got interested in other non-English Wiki(pedia)s, so I decided to make this episode about other ones out there, including Simple English, Old English, Tok Pisin, Pig Latin, and Klingon. Yes, that’s right: Pig Latin.


Show notes

There are lots of Wikipedias out there.
http://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/List_of_Wikipedias

All the text and HTML takes about 7.9 GB.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia_talk:Size_of_Wikipedia#size_in_GB

Latin Wikipedia
http://la.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pagina_prima

Latin Wikipedians tell all
http://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/Tell_us_about_Latin_Wikipedia

There’s also Tok Pisin.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tok_Pisin

This is the Tok Pisin Wikipedia page for Linguistics.
http://tpi.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lingwistiks

About Lojban
http://jbo.wikipedia.org/wiki/lojban.

The Lojban Wikipedia is completely beyond me.
http://jbo.wikipedia.org/wiki/ralju_ckupau

The Pig Latin Wikipedia never really got off the ground.
http://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/Requests_for_new_languages/Wikipedia_Pig_Latin

But there is an unofficial one on Wikia. I hit the Andomray Agepay, which gave me the page for the Unitedway Atesstay.
http://cyclopedianay.wikia.com/wiki/Unitedway_Atesstay

And Klingon
http://klingon.wikia.com/wiki/ghItlh%27a%27

Old English Wiki
http://ang.wikipedia.org/wiki/H%C4%93afods%C4%ABde

About Anglish
http://suite101.com/article/anglish-a410810

The page for ‘science’, or in Anglish, ‘lore’
http://anglish.wikia.com/wiki/Lore

List of lores
http://anglish.wikia.com/wiki/List_of_Lores

Here’s the Simple English Wikipedia page, explaining the Theory of Relativity.
http://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theory_of_relativity


Show tunes

‘Epigram’ by Tycho
from the album Dive

‘English House’ by Fleet Foxes
from the album Sun Giant

Episode 21: King James Version

This week marks the 400th anniversary of the King James Version of the Bible.

It’s considered a masterpiece of English literature, and it’s had considerable impact on the English language. What is it about the King James Version that has even atheists singing its praises? And how does it stand up to newer versions?

UWA linguist Daniel Midgley gets religion on this week’s Talk the Talk.


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Show notes

Let’s start with the New York Times:
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/24/weekinreview/24mcgrath.html?_r=1

The AP story is good too.
http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/ap/world/7545344.html

Compare Ecclesiastes (or any other verses) in two bible versions:
http://www.biblestudytools.com/parallel-bible/passage.aspx?q=ecclesiastes+1&t=kjv&t2=gnt

Richard Dawkins likes the KJV as literature:
http://www.newstatesman.com/religion/2010/12/king-james-bible-poetry-shall
http://www.kingjamesbibletrust.org/news/2010/02/19/richard-dawkins-lends-his-support-to-the-king-james-bible-trust

So does Christopher Hitchens:
http://www.vanityfair.com/culture/features/2011/05/hitchens-201105?currentPage=all

And some people can’t tolerate anything else.
http://www.foxnews.com/us/2009/10/22/pastor-host-halloween-bible-burning-event/

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